May 22, 2024
B”H
B”H

Defining the Meaning of Olam Chesed Yibaneh

Women Volunteers Sorting Out Clothes for Charity

Judaism is a religion built upon many important values and principles. One such value is Olam Chesed Yibaneh, which translates to “I will build this world with kindness” in English. This article explains what it means in both literal and philanthropic contexts, and how it is an integral part of Jewish belief and tradition.

What Does Olam Chesed Yibaneh Mean?

Olam Chesed Yibaneh is a Hebrew phrase that translates to “I will build this world with kindness.” The words are rooted in Jewish history and can be found throughout various religious texts and prayers, most notably Psalm 89:3. In this chapter, the psalmist praises G-d and declares that His lovingkindness will endure forever.

Olam Chesed Yibaneh Psalm

‍We should strive to make a difference.

To this goal we must stay true.

Just can’t stand by while there’s suffering.

There’s so much we can do.

In G-d’s eyes we’re all His children.

Each one special in their own way.

The less fortunate among us, we must protect without delay.

Let’s build a world that’s paved in kindness

and a world where we all care.

This can be our future.

This should be our prayer.

(Olam Chesed Yibaneh, Olam Chesed Yibaneh, Olam Chesed Yibaneh, Yibaneh) x 2

Olam Chesed Yibaneh Lyrics

Olam Chesed Yibaneh is also widely known for being the focus of a popular song of the same name. Written by Rabbi Menachem Creditor Olam Chesed Yibaneh was released in 2015 and has since been covered by various artists and sung in synagogues around the world.

The lyrics of the song are a call to action, urging listeners to make a positive impact on the world through acts of kindness:

Olam chesed yibaneh

I will build this world from love

And you must build this world from love

And if we build this world from love

Then G-d will build this world from love

Olam Chesed Yibaneh Translation Explained

Learning the English words for Olam Chesed Yibaneh in Hebrew is just the beginning of one’s journey to understanding its deeper meaning. More than just another quote, this statement represents our people’s commitment to G-d’s vision for the world. It goes hand-in-hand with Tikkun Olam, which translates to “repairing the world”, as a core concept of the Jewish faith.

We believe that life’s meaning is best fulfilled through acts that reverence G-d (Kiddush Hashem), like work, worship, and service (Avodah). The significance of cultural traditions in Jewish charity is what drives us to adopt a lifestyle of altruism and respect for all (Kavod HaBriyot) – because everyone benefits when we all take care of each other, or Kol Yisrael Arevim Zeh Bazeh.

Putting Olam Chesed Yibaneh Words Into Practice

You could study the Torah, Jewish law (Halacha), and the written Olam Chesed Yibaneh text of Psalms 89:3, but there’s nothing like practicing what we preach to make the principles of Olam Chesed Yibaneh a reality. We’re all encouraged by Chabad leaders, prominent rebbes, and G-d to turn teachings into action by actively seeking opportunities to spread loving kindness and compassion in our daily lives.

Many Jewish practices and customs make doing so easy. For example, tithing (Ma’aser Kesafim) is a common tradition in which Jews donate a tenth of their income to charities for the poor, organizations that support widows, orphans’ charities, and other non-profits.

It’s similar to Pe’ah, which translates to corner, and refers to ancient Jewish farmers’ practice of leaving a portion of their harvests to provide for the poor. Today, the same idea of saving part of one’s own blessings for others is equally practicable by donating to charities that fight food insecurity, organizations dedicated to healthcare, or any other cause with benefit for the larger community. And while there are Jewish organizations for children’s education, refugees, and everything in between, you don’t necessarily need to contribute to a good Jewish charity in order to make a difference.

The Chabad movement strongly emphasizes the power that loving compassion and Tzedek can have on society. There are plenty of Jewish traditions that exhibit it, such as visiting the sick (Bikur Cholim) and welcoming others (Hachnasat Orchim). In fact, there are Eight Degrees of Giving you can draw inspiration from when looking to impact the world in a positive way.

How Colel Chabad Brings Jewish Charity Tradition to Life

Israel has many historic Jewish charities within its borders, but none possess over 200 years of operation like Colel Chabad. Founded in 1788, our organization is the oldest continuously running non-profit of its kind.

We exist with the main goal of bringing Jewish charity tradition to life in modern times through acts of philanthropic giving (tzedakah). Colel Chabad administers a wide range of social service programs designed to promote trust (Bitachon), humility (Anavah), and dignity in the community. 

Soup Kitchens

At the center of Colel Chabad’s food activities in Israel is United Soup Kitchens, a network of 22 free eateries spread around Jerusalem. We provide wholesome, filling meals to thousands of impoverished Jews every month of the year. 

Food Distribution Centers

Our food security initiative feeds 26,130 families per month in 239 municipalities by delivering fresh produce, dry goods like rice, beans, lentils, and peas, and Food Cards that can be used at nearby supermarkets to those in need.

Daycare

Our network of childcare centers for underprivileged kids, which covers 16 key areas and serves 970 kids, is a perfect example of Colel Chabad’s dedication to Israel’s future. Colel Chabad guarantees that all children, irrespective of their origin, affiliation, or level of Jewish practice, get compassionate care. 

Charitable contributions go towards serving those in need – of which there are currently many as Israel needs help addressing ongoing challenges such as poverty, hunger, and unemployment. Colel Chabad is the best place to donate for initiatives against all of these issues and more. 

While prayers and blessings are powerful mitzvot, the initiative of giving or signing up to volunteer is even more so. Put Olam Chesed Yibaneh into practice by getting involved with Colel Chabad today. 

EN

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